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Feeding Recommendations

Complete and Balanced?

Because Dr. B’s BARF patties and rolls for both dogs and cats are formulated according to the principles of Evolutionary Nutrition, they may be fed as the whole diet; alternatively, they may be combined with varying proportions of raw meaty bones, with or without the addition of other whole raw healthy foods. The Evolutionary Nutritional principle being employed here states that when you feed the range of foods an animal evolved to require, its entire nutritional requirements will be met.

Important: To avoid over feeding (and therefore the possibility of Obesity); when feeding Dr. B’s BARF, together with other healthy foods, reduce the weight of the BARF being fed by an amount equivalent to the weight of the other healthy foods that are being fed.

Typically, many raw feeders will feed equal amounts of our BARF patties and raw meaty bones. Again, typically, these will be fed at alternate meals.

When choosing raw meaty bones, it is important to ensure that they are derived from healthy young animals and are therefore toxin free and relatively soft (compared to bones from older animals). Raw meaty bones commonly used include chicken necks, wings, frames and carcasses, lamb flaps, beef brisket, soft pork bones, kangaroo tails, ox tails etc.

How much BARF Do I feed my Dog?

The simplest way to work this out is as a percentage of bodyweight.

Healthy Dogs – Not Exercising

Feed 2% - 3% of bodyweight per day – divided into one or two meals

Working, Racing, Active Dogs

Feed 3% - 6% of bodyweight per day when actually working or active. At this time feed food with a higher fat content to increase the energy supply. Feed 2% - 3% of bodyweight per day when not active or working

Puppies – Small to Medium Breeds

Feed 3% - 5% of bodyweight per day – divided into 3 to 4 small meals

Puppies – Large and Giant Breeds

Feed 2% - 4% of bodyweight per day – divided into 3 to 4 meals. It is important to ensure that these puppies grow slowly. To ensure that this happens, it can be useful to add extra vegetable pulp to the patties (from a juicer). Feed soft raw bones daily. Note: – feed BARF and soft raw bones from young animals as the only source of calcium; it is not necessary and may be harmful to use calcium supplements. (For more information – refer to Dr. Billinghurst’s book – “Grow Your Pups with Bones.”)

Pregnant (‘in whelp’) Female Dogs

For the first two thirds of pregnancy, feed 2% - 3% of bodyweight per day – divided into one or two meals. For the last third of pregnancy increase this to 3% - 4% of bodyweight per day – divided into two or three meals. (For more information – refer to Dr. Billinghurst’s book – “Grow Your Pups with Bones.”)

Lactating Female Dogs

Depending on Litter size and the age of the puppies, feed from between 3% and 6% of bodyweight per day – divided into two or three meals – up to free choice with large litters. (For more information – refer to Dr. Billinghurst’s book – “Grow Your Pups with Bones.”)

Dogs with Health Issues – for example, Kidney, Liver or Pancreatic Disease

These dogs usually require extra vegetable material, sometimes with less fat; in the latter case, combine Dr. B’s Kangaroo flavour with raw pulped low glycaemic index vegetable material. For simple obesity, reduce the amount of BARF and Raw Meaty Bones and replace with as much raw pulped low glycaemic index vegetable material as the dog will eat.

The following table is a simplified version of the feeding guide described above, simply based on how active your dog is:

Approximate Number of 227 gm Dog Patties to Feed Per Day Based on the Percentage of a Dog’s Bodyweight

Weight of dog

Inactive

Moderately Active

Extremely Active

1 – 5 Kg

0.5

0.75

1

6 – 12 Kg

1

1.25

1.75

13 – 21 Kg

1.25

1.75

2.25

22 – 30 kg

1.75

2.5

3

31 ‐ 41 kg

2.25

3.5

4

42 ‐ 52 kg

2.75

4

4.5

53 ‐ 63 kg

3

4.5

5

Important: Always adjust the amount you feed to maintain the desired bodyweight and condition.

Note:

  • A growing puppy would be considered to be extremely to moderately active depending on breed and age
  • A pregnant female would be moderately active through to mid-pregnancy, then extremely active in late pregnancy
  • A lactating female would be considered extremely active

How much BARF Do I feed my Cat?

The simplest way to work this out is as a percentage of bodyweight.

Healthy Adult Cats

Feed 4 % of bodyweight per day – divided into two to three meals

Kittens

Feed 5 % - 6 % of bodyweight per day – divided into 4 to 5 meals

Pregnant Female Cats

  • For the first third of pregnancy, feed 4 % of bodyweight per day – divided into two to three meals.

  • For the second third of pregnancy, feed 4 % - 5 % of bodyweight per day – divided into three meals.

  • For the last third of pregnancy feed 5 % of bodyweight per day – divided into four meals.

Lactating Female Cats

Depending on Litter size and the age of the kittens, feed from between 5% of bodyweight per day – divided into two or three meals – up to free choice with large litters.

Approximate Number of 115 gm Cat Patties to Feed Per Day Based on the Percentage of a Cat’s Bodyweight

Bodyweight

Inactive (most cats) 

 Growing / Pregnant 

 Lactating 

1.0 Kg

0.30

0.50

0.6

2.0 Kg

0.60

0.75

1.00

3.0 Kg

1.00

1.30

1.50

4.0 kg

1.50

1.75

2.00

5.0 Kg

1.75

2.00

2.50

6.0 Kg

2.00

2.50

3.00

7.0 Kg

2.25

2.75

3.50

• Note a very active outdoor adult cat may need to be fed to the growing / pregnant recommendations if it is not maintaining condition

Important Information for Cat owners

1. Always adjust the amount you feed your cat so as to maintain the desired body weight and condition.

2. In cases of feline Obesity, reduce the amount of food fed (remove dry foods and sugary foods completely from your cat’s menu!), reduce bones and reduce fat, but do not starve the cat. Reduce the calories further by adding small amounts of low glycaemic index vegetable pulp to the thawed patties – for example, use the pulp from your juicer.

Preparation

A raw food diet for companion animals will spoil if left unrefrigerated for an extended period of time. To thaw Dr. B’s Patties or Rolls, remove from the BARF from its plastic and place it in a container with a lid and defrost in the refrigerator. Excess food should be refrigerated for the next feeding or discarded. Patties and rolls should be kept in the freezer until required for thawing. Please note: some dogs, especially in summer, prefer to have their Dr. B’s BARF presented in a frozen state.

Safe Handling Instructions for Dr. B’s BARF

Raw Meat Products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if mishandled. It is important to wash all working surfaces, utensils and hands with hot soapy water after handling BARF and after each feeding. Treat Dr. B’s BARF as you would any raw meat product. Important: Do not re-freeze Dr. B’s BARF once it has been thawed.